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Rebekah Gundry

Rebekah Gundry

TALK TITLE: The Surfaceome of Human Cells: A Sweet Source of Novel Immunophentotyping and Immunotherapy Targets

BIO:
Dr. Gundry obtained her PhD from the Middle Atlantic Mass Spectrometry laboratory at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, under the direction of Dr. Robert Cotter, and conducted her postdoctoral work at the JHU Bayview Proteomics Center in the Division of Cardiology, directed by Dr. Jennifer E. Van Eyk. She also spent time studying at the ETH, Zurich with Drs. Ruedi Aebersold and Bernd Wollscheid. Since establishing her laboratory at the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) in 2010, she has focused on studying cell surface proteins and metabolism in pluripotent stem cells and their cardiogenic derivatives. In 2013, she received the inaugural Robert J. Cotter Young Investigator Award from US HUPO. Dr. Gundry has published more than 40 papers, is currently on the editorial board of Proteomics, and was recently appointed Director of MCW’s new Center for Biomedical Mass Spectrometry Research

ABSTRCT:
The surfaceome is a rich source of accessible live cell markers for targeted drug delivery, immunotherapy, and cell sorting without requiring genetic modifications. Despite its utility and critical roles in biology and disease, the surfaceome has not yet been defined for most human cell types. Using a selective chemoproteomic approach termed Cell Surface Capture Technology, we are able to generate a unique view of the cell surface N-glycoproteome of any mammalian cell type. Combining surfaceome data from disparate cell types within the Cell Surface Protein Atlas, new targets for immunophenotyping and immunotherapy are rapidly identified. To date, we have applied this strategy to identify new cell type specific markers for stem cell derivatives and primary cells of multiple developmental stages, lineages, and diseases – from cardiac fibroblasts, cardiomyocytes, epithelial cells, and hepatocytes to blood cancers. In progress are new approaches to facilitate the systematic mapping of surfaceomes across a broad range of cell types, including those in limited supply, to enable quantitative studies of surfaceome dynamics during development and disease.

rebekah