hupo2017@conferencepartners.ie

Pauline Rudd

Pauline Rudd

Talk Title:
Deciphering the glycoproteome: a small step towards understanding the complexity of biological systems

Biography:
Professor Pauline M. Rudd BSc, LRIC, MA (Oxon), FISSR, PhD heads the GlycoSciences Group at NIBRT, Ireland and is a Visiting Investigator at BTI, A-Star, Singapore. She obtained a BSc at the University of London and a PhD at the Open University. Before moving to Dublin (2006) she was University Reader in Glycobiology at Oxford University. She was a Founding Scientist of Wessex Biochemicals, Visiting Research Associate at The Scripps Research Institute, Visiting Professor at Shanghai Medical University, Visiting Scientist at Ben Gurion University Israel, Erskine Visiting Fellow, Canterbury University, NZ. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine, Visiting Professor at St. George’s Hospital, and Adjunct Professor at NE University, Boston, UC Dublin, NUI Galway and Trinity College Dublin. 2010: James Gregory Medal,Agilent Thought Leader award. 2012/2017: Waters’ Global Centres of Innovation Awards in NIBRT/BTI. 2014: Honorary Doctorate Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University.

Abstract:

Deciphering the glycoproteome: a small step towards understanding the complexity of biological systems
Radka Fahey, Roisin O’Flaherty, Sinead Hallinan, Mark Hilliard, Pauline M Rudd,

Alterations in glycosylation are common in physiological and pathological processes. Glycan structures are, in the first instance, controlled by genes, however the complex pathways, systems, environment and epigenetic factors that regulate their expression may provide a further mechanism for fine tuning physiological responses by diversifying the glycans and the functions of the proteins to which they are attached. Determining the impact of post-genomic factors on glycosylation processing is a relatively underexplored field and has led us to develop new automated multiplexed technologies and bioinformatics that can match the output from other –omics platforms. This talk will focus on our recent attempts to explore an integrated glycobiology approach to cancer that links the glycome to the proteome, transcriptome, metabolome, lipidome and genome. This has enabled us to gain a deeper insight into some of the pathways involved and is a step towards precision medicine.