hupo2017@conferencepartners.ie

Mathias Uhlen

Mathias Uhlen

Talk Title:
The Human Protein Atlas and next generation antibody therapeutics

Bio:

Dr Uhlen is a professor at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden. His research is focused on protein science, antibody engineering and precision medicine and range from basic research to more applied research, including clinical applications in cancer, infectious diseases, cardiovascular diseases, autoimmune diseases and neurobiology. The research has resulted in more than 650 publications with a current h-index of 101 (Google Scholar). Since 2003, he has led an international effort to systematically map the human proteome with antibodies and to create an open source knowledge-based resource called the Human Protein Atlas (www.proteinatlas.org). Based on the Protein Atlas effort (Uhlen et al, Science, 2015), he has launched a new wellness profiling effort in which individuals have been monitored every three months and analyzed using whole genome sequencing, cell analysis, proteomics, metabolomics and microbiome analysis. He is member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in USA, the Royal Swedish Academy of Science (KVA), the Swedish Academy of Engineering Science (IVA) and the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO). He was, starting in 2010, the founding Director of the Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab), a national center for molecular bioscience (www.scilifelab.se).

Key references:

  1. Uhlen et al (2010) Nature Biotechnology 28: 1248-50
  2. Uhlen et al (2015) Science 347: 1260419
  3. Uhlen et al (2016) Mol Systems Biol. 4(12): 862
  4. Uhlen et al (2016) Nature Methods 13: 823–827

Abstract:

The Human Protein Atlas and next generation antibody therapeutics

Mathias Uhlen, Science for Life Laboratory, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden
The human proteins constitute the major building blocks for the function of the various processes necessary for human life. We have classified all the protein coding genes in humans using a combination of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and antibody-based profiling. We have classified all the protein coding genes in humans using a combination of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and antibody-based profiling and used this data to study the global protein expression patterns in human cells, tissues and organs. A Tissue Atlas was launch in 2014 (Uhlen et al, Science, 2015), a Cell Atlas in 2016 (Thul et al, Science, in press) and a Pathology Atlas will be launched in 2017. Recently, we have also set-up an animal cell factory using CHO cells using synthetic biology and high-throughput expression systems with the aim to produce full-length proteins representing all the 2,900 secreted proteins encoded in human genome.